Full article by Samin Vafaee available at Sacramento News & Review

In 2018, Hasta Muerte Coffee, a worker-owned cooperative in Oakland received notice its building’s owner put the property up for sale and had a pending offer. They worried about the displacement of not only their cooperative, but also the two low-income families that lived upstairs. 

Hasta Muerte connected with the Oakland’s Community Land Trust (OakCLT), and within a month, $600,000 from 22 community investors as well as $150,000 in crowdfunded donations were secured. OakCLT also provided an equity contribution. And with that the two apartments became permanently affordable for people earning less than 80% the average area median income. Additionally, the commercial space downstairs “will always house community-serving organizations,” according to OakCLT. 

In Marin County’s Point Reyes, a woman sold her home to the Community Land Trust of West Marin for $550,000 — about half of its $1 million value — with the promise that it will be kept affordable for a future homeowner. The retired preschool teacher, who was 81 years old at the time of the sale, is able to remain living in the home until her death.

The nonprofit Sacramento Community Land Trust is attempting to do something similar to these Bay Area groups. Since the organization’s launch in 2016, the SCLT has been soliciting donations, and preparing its goal to help people gain more access to permanently affordable housing, while also preventing displacement in the future. The organization focuses primarily on historically discriminated populations, including Black people, undocumented immigrants and those who identify as LGBTQ. SCLT describes itself “as dedicated to serving households at or below 80% area median income.”

Full article by Samin Vafaee available at Sacramento News & Review